Rey Bango

Web developer, honey badger

Eloquent JavaScript is one of the Best JavaScript Books I’ve Read

The kind folks at No Starch sent me over a copy of the newly released book, Eloquent JavaScript by Marjin Haverbeke. I had already been recommending the namesake site as a must-read resource on my list of What to Read to Get Up to Speed in JavaScript so actually having the book was a welcome change. I know some people love to read stuff on the web but call me old fashioned in that I really like the feel of a book in my hands.

What I loved about this book is that it’s not your typical reference tomb. The basic premise is that it’s going to teach you proper constructs for writing solid JavaScript code as opposed to listing every method, attribute, data type or property ever included in the JavaScript language. It gets straight to the meat of JavaScript development, introducing you to the basic constructs of the language and then quickly diving into more complex topics such as partials and currying. This is all done in a step-by-step approach to give the reader an opportunity to not only digest the material but also see actual results in real-time. Definitely a great approach.

Differences Between the Site and the Book

As I mentioned the book is based on the great work that Marjin did on the namesake site. I’ve seen the site and absolutely love it but to me, I feel the book is a MUCH more organized version of his thoughts. The content is broken down into logical sections with better headers which makes conceptualizing specific areas much easier.

And again, I truly am partial to reading books instead of websites so for me, having the book was a real blessing.

What about JavaScript Libraries?

This book is really focused on the JavaScript language itself and not libraries. If you’re interested in really becoming a better JavaScript developer so you can take full advantage of your favorite library, then this book is a great choice. It’s a complementary selection.

Why We Built the JSMentors.com JavaScript Mailing List

I posted earlier this week about the launch of the JSMentors.com mailing list. So far the response has been amazing. The list has grown from 344 on Nov 29 to 900+ today. Just phenomenal growth and a testament to the need of the list. But where did this idea come from?

comp.lang.javascript Was Not for Me

I’ve been involved in the JavaScript community for some time, especially with the jQuery JavaScript library project. I’ve been fortunate to make a lot of friends who have helped me overcome many of the pitfalls and hurdles normally associated with becoming a JavaScript developer. As I began feeling more confident, I did what I feel most people do when they want to advance their skills to the next level and ventured over to comp.lang.javascript (CLJ). CLJ has a long history due to its roots in the newsgroup mediums which predated forums as the main method of communicating about many topics. I had heard that the developers there were top notch and you could find great content. To me, this was the obvious place to go. So I went. And I regretted it.

Everything people said was true. There are many incredibly smart and savvy JavaScript developers there; I would say some of the best in the world. The problem I encountered was a consistent lack of manners, courtesy and respect that completely overshadowed any of the conversations that were going on. I’m not alone in this feeling. And this seemed to be happening due to a small but vocal minority that tended to hijack any thread and turn them into their own chest-thumping diatribe. I’ve dealt with tough crowds before but even I was shocked by what was happening here. Couple that with the insane amount of spam being posted there, I knew that *I* wouldn’t be successful in this environment (CLJ) in spite of some of the great information being posted. Notice how I highlighted “*I*”. That’s because CLJ may be perfectly suited for others. I know several developers who participate and find it useful. It just wasn’t for me.

A Community Resource

So I began chatting with Asen Bozhilov about this and explained how I would love to see a list where anyone who wanted to become a better JavaScript developer could go to and participate in a courteous, respectful and professional environment. It was also important to have as many of the non-confrontational experts on CLJ serve as mentors and share their knowledge with people who genuinely wanted to learn but didn’t want to be shot down or berated due to their skill level. So Asen & I set about creating JSMentors.com. Asen is one of this super experts and he has very close ties with many of the experts on CLJ. After chatting with them a bit, many found this to be a great idea, especially since it offered them:

  • A chance to teach best practices to an ever-growing community of developers
  • A medium to publish content that they felt was important
  • An opportunity for the JavaScript world to meet these top developers and begin learning from some of the best

The important part was that each of these mentors understood that this list was going to be very different and that our goal was to nurture a community. And we made the rules of the list perfectly clear to ensure no confusion:

  • No insulting other subscribers
  • No posting racism
  • No spam publications

This had to be different from CLJ to work. It had to focus not only on the language but also the community.

JSMentors.com is Born

The list was launched with little fanfare. We wanted it to grow organically to see how people would react and that was a great tact. Since launching, we’ve steadily grown the mailing list as well as the list of mentors. The great thing is that we’re getting top-level developers involved who would never had considered participating in CLJ due to the tough nature of communication there. This was exactly what we wanted. A place where developers of ALL skill levels can go and exchange ideas in a professional setting. It’s not to say that occasionally there won’t be disagreements. That’s normal. But Asen & I actively monitor the list and we’re adamant about the rules we’ve set and maintaining a good list. Ultimately, we want everyone to become better developers and yes, I have a little selfish motivation myself as the opportunity to learn from so many top developers is one my drivers for this list. And I think that’s a good thing. :)

JSMentors.com – The Mailing List to Learn JavaScript in a Professional and Courteous Environment

There are a number of resources on the Internet for reading up on JavaScript but very few viable options for actually exchanging ideas with extremely knowledgeable JavaScript developers, especially when it comes to just wanting to know about JavaScript itself and not a specific JS library. This was a pain point I personally felt when I wanted to learn more about the language and be able to have “mentors” that could help me better understand JS and ECMAScript.

After chatting a bit with JavaScript expert Asen Bozhilov about this, we decided to fill that hole by launching a new mailing list called JSMentors that allows developers to get to know the language and find the expert guidance in a friendly and professional environment. The list offers developers a place to:

  • Discuss ECMA-262 standard
  • Discuss different implementations of ECMA-262
  • Discuss different host environments of JavaScript
  • Discuss implementation of algorithms in JavaScript
  • Discuss your library design
  • Review your code
  • Review your book on JavaScript topic
  • Review your article on JavaScript topic

We also wanted to provide a list that was professional, courteous, and friendly to developers of all skill levels. Too many forums, newsgroups and lists look down on beginners or questions deemed too introductory and we wanted to ensure that JSMentors didn’t fall into that same hole. So we created a set of simple rules. Via the JSMentors mailing list you must not:

  • Insult other subscribers
  • Post racism
  • Spam publications

So far it’s been working great and developers are getting the mentoring that they desperately want and need. And the great thing is that the mentors are a who’s-who of the JavaScript world. Check out this list:

  • Garrett Smith
  • Juriy Zaytsev a.k.a. kangax
  • Dmitry A. Soshnikov
  • Steven Levithan
  • John-David Dalton
  • Stoyan Stefanov
  • Benjamin Rosseaux a.k.a. BeRo
  • Diego Perini
  • Angus Croll
  • Peter van der Zee
  • Christian C. Salvadó
  • Peter Michaux

One important thing to note is that the main focus of the list is the JavaScript language and while you can post about JavaScript libraries, you’re more likely to get a better answer in a library’s specific support forum or list than on JSMentors.com.

Asen and I would like to invite developers to join JSMentors.com and create a productive list to help everyone become better JavaScript developers and help push the web forward.

Tell Me the Development Problems that Script Junkie Can Try to Solve via Solutions-based Content

My biggest focus at Microsoft is the Script Junkie website. We use it to publish really great cross-browser, solutions-based content to help developers improve their JavaScript, HTML, & CSS development efforts.

The Script Junkie team is working on our content plan for the next six months and we’re looking to identify developer problem areas that we can provide solutions for. So I’m reaching out to my blog readers in an effort to understand what type of things pain you. Here are some examples of problem areas that we’ve heard of:

  • Designing and implementing for multiple devices like 42″ LCD TVs to 480px Android device
  • Getting users to upgrade their browsers in a friendly way
  • Developing cross-browser compatible websites with minimal hacks
  • How realistic is it to begin using HTML5 & CSS3 today?

It’s important to note that that we’re not looking for answers to the above problem areas at this time. These are examples to demonstrate the type of concerns we’re hearing. We’re looking for more questions that hopefully we can answer via solutions-based articles and code. So if you have thoughts on wide-spread development problems that you’d like to see tackled, please comment below. Remember that Script Junkie focuses on JavaScript, HTML and CSS so please be sure to keep that in mind when listing out your pain points.

We’ll roll-up your comments and then focus on the top 10 things listed by the development community.

Thanks for your help!

The Essential List of JavaScript, jQuery, HTML & CSS Books to Make You a Better Web Developer

Over the years, I’ve read or been recommended a number of books which are essential reading for professional web developers. I’ve compiled the list of books below to help the community find a comprehensive list of good books that can help them be better coders.

JavaScript

Professional JavaScript for Web Developers – My new favorite book. Almost 1,000 pages of VERY detailed JavaScript information. Written by Nicholas Zakas, Yahoo! Principal Front-end Engineer for Yahoo!’s home page and recommended by the YUI team as well. BUY THIS BOOK!

JavaScript: The Definitive Guide – Considered the Bible of JavaScript for its thorough coverage of JavaScript. You need to have this in your library, even as a reference.

DOM Scripting: Web Design with JavaScript and the Document Object Model – This is a good book to get you familiar with the DOM.

AdvancED DOM Scripting: Dynamic Web Design Techniques

Beginning JavaScript with DOM Scripting and Ajax: From Novice to Professional – The book by Christian Heilmann that really got me past the initial hump of plain ‘ole JavaScript. His writing style is awesome.

Object-Oriented JavaScript: Create scalable, reusable high-quality JavaScript applications and libraries – JUST BUY THIS BOOK! Stoyan did a great job of outlining OOJS principles and it’s been incredibly valuable.

JavaScript: The Good Parts – It’s certainly a good book and I would recommend reading it after one of the more intro books like JS for Web Developer by Nicholas Zakas.

Learning jQuery 1.3 – While covering jQuery v1.3, the techniques discussed are still useful and I still recommend the book highly.

Pro JavaScript Techniques – John Resig’s famous book on advanced JS techniques.

Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja – Still not out but considering that John Resig is that author, it’s sure to be great.

ppk on JavaScript, 1/e – One of the first books I picked up and great overview of the language.

Accelerated DOM Scripting with Ajax, APIs, and Libraries

Ajax Security – Billy Hoffman is the man when it comes to Ajax security and this books shows why.

jQuery Cookbook: Solutions & Examples for jQuery Developers (Animal Guide) – Tips & techniques from the jQuery team rolled up in a cookbook style. You can’t go wrong.

jQuery in Action, Second Edition – This is now updated for jQuery v1.4.x as well as jQuery UI 1.8.x. Definitely a must-have for jQuery developers

jQuery Enlightenment – Cody Lindley did an amazing job in outlining the best jQuery techniques in this self-published book. Totally worth the price.

Test-Driven JavaScript Development

jQuery: Novice to Ninja

HTML & CSS

Web Standards Solutions: The Markup and Style Handbook, Special Edition

Bulletproof Web Design: Improving flexibility and protecting against worst-case scenarios with XHTML and CSS (2nd Edition)

The Art & Science Of CSS – This is one of Sitepoint’s best CSS books. Loved it.

HTML Utopia: Designing Without Tables Using CSS, 2nd Edition – Not being a designer, I thought this book was a tremendous help in understanding how to better design sites.

Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML – This has been my goto book for some time. The Head First books are just so great at breaking down topics in easy to understand ways and this book is no exception.

Introducing HTML5 (Voices That Matter) – Going to get this soon mainly because it’s written by Remy Sharp and Bruce Lawson whom I respect tremendously, especially for their HTML5 & CSS3 savvy.

HTML5 For Web Designers – Just got this on 7/19/10. Need to read it by it’s by Jeremy Keith and he rocks.

CSS Cookbook, 3rd Edition (Animal Guide) – Just picked this up on a recommendation.

CSS: The Missing Manual – I keep hearing rave reviews about this book all over the place.

Site Performance & Enhancement

High Performance Web Sites: Essential Knowledge for Front-End Engineers – Steve Souders is the performance guru and if you want your apps to perform better, get this book and the one right below this one.

Even Faster Web Sites: Performance Best Practices for Web Developers

High Performance JavaScript (Build Faster Web Application Interfaces) – Again, another great book by Nicholas Zakas which outlines very important performance techniques for JavaScript applications.

Designing with Progressive Enhancement: Building the Web that Works for Everyone – Great book on progressive enhancement by the superstars at the Filament Group.

This is certainly not all inclusive and I’m sure there are other books out there that have been great. If you feel very passionate about a specific title, let me know via the comments and I’ll check it out.

jQuery JavaScript Templates Tutorial: Inline Expressions and Code Blocks

So far in my series on jQuery JavaScript Templating, I’ve showed how to create a basic jQuery JavaScript template and then nest templates for increased layout flexibility and maintainability. If you haven’t read those two posts, I highly recommend you do so you can understand the concepts below.

Now, let’s dive into two other techniques available in the Microsoft jQuery Templates plugin; inline expressions and code blocks.

Inline Expressions

Being able to use a template to create a succinct layout is very powerful but without the ability to manipulate the data that’s being rendered, you’d probably find templates a lot less useful. That’s where inline expressions come in. Inline expressions allow you to use common JavaScript expressions to effect a change in the way your data is rendered. Using a slightly modified version of the data from my last tutorial, I can show you what I mean. Here’s the data:

var clientData = [
     { first: "Rey", last: "Bango", age: 42, id: 1, phone: [ "954-600-1234", "954-355-5555" ] },
     { first: "Mark", last: "Goldberg", age: 51, id: 2, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] },
     { first: "Jen", last: "Statford", age: "25", id: 3, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] }
 ];

What I did was break out the “name” attribute into “first” and “last” name fields. Now, say I wanted to render the full name in my template. I would use the following inline expression to do so:

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
    <p><li>${ first + " " + last }</li></p>
</script>

Which gives me the following result:

Notice that I’m using the standard JavaScript “+” operator to concatenate the two data attributes together to form my final output. JavaScript developers should immediately be able to understand the code here and see how flexible this option is.

Code Blocks

Now, while inline expressions are certainly powerful, the ability to affect the data via code blocks is even more important because it allows you to specify conditional statements that can be used to determine what type of and when data will be represented. Let’s say that based on the age of a client, I want to show some text next to their name. I’ll use the following code block:

{{if (age > 30)}}veteran coder!{{else}}rising star!{{/if}}

This code block allows me to specify a conditional statement that allows me to create a nice descriptor based on the person’s age. The key is the “{{if..else}}” custom tag that’s been incorporated into the template plugin that allows you to specify conditional statements.

Here’s what the template would look like:

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
    <p><li>${ first + " " + last + " is a " }{{if (age > 30)}}veteran coder!{{else}}rising star!{{/if}}</li> </p>
</script>

which generates the following results:

And again, the cool thing is that the syntax for the expressions use standard JavaScript operators so I can do something like this as well:

{{if (age > 20 && age < 30 || age == 42)}}rising star!{{else}}veteran coder!{{/if}}

The thing to stress here is that using inline expressions and code blocks together can give you a tremendous amount of control over how you control you data. You have the flexibility you’d expect by using JavaScript but in a manner that is easily readable and maintainable.

Here’s the final code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
  <meta name="robots" content="noindex" />
  <title>Template Test</title>
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  <script src="jquery.tmpl.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {
 
var clientData = [
     { first: "Rey", last: "Bango", age: 42, id: 1, phone: [ "954-600-1234", "954-355-5555" ] },
     { first: "Mark", last: "Goldberg", age: 51, id: 2, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] },
     { first: "Jen", last: "Statford", age: "25", id: 3, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] }
 ];
 
        $("#clientTemplate").tmpl(clientData).appendTo("div");
 
});
  </script>
 
<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
    <p><li>${ first + " " + last + " is a " }{{if (age > 20 && age < 30 || age == 42)}}rising star!{{else}}veteran coder!{{/if}}</li> </p>
</script>
 
</head>
 
<body>
 
<div></div>
 
</body>
</html>

The Source Code for my Twitter Demo from the Think Vitamin jQuery Online Conference Templating Presentation

I just finished my presentation at Think Vitamin’s jQuery Online Conference and it was such a great experience. This is the first BIG virtual conference I’ve presented at and it ran smooth as silk. I really have to hand it to the Carsonified team; they have their act together. :)

The big takeaways:

  • Online conferences rock! No travel == less expenses.
  • The technology is good enough to be able to do this and WebEx is awesome.
  • Carsonified’s got this down. While some tech problems are expected, they’ve really got the process working well.

The only downside, from a speaker perspective, is that you really can’t see how your audience is reacting. That’s tough because sometimes, you’re able to adjust according to your audience’s feedback. If there’s dead silence, you know you need to bring them back. If they’re engaged, you know you’re on track. In a virtual conference, you can’t gauge that so it’s tough.

Lots of folks have asked for the code for the Twitter demo that I did. You can now download that below:

Download the Twitter Demo Source

I want to thank everyone for attending and for the kind words. I really appreciate it. I also want to thank Carsonified for giving me the opportunity to speak at a great event.

jQuery JavaScript Templates Tutorial: Nesting Templates

In my last post, I presented an intro to how to create a template using the new jQuery Template plugin being developed by the Microsoft Ajax Core team. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to nest templates to have great control over your layout.

The nesting of a template within another template is a pretty valuable feature as it lets you create a modular structure for your layout. Instead of having to create one enormous template to cover every scenario, you can break the layout apart into individual templates and piece them together. Let’s start by defining some data:

       var clientData = [
	        { name: "Rey Bango", age: 42, id: 1, phone: [ "954-600-1234", "954-355-5555" ] },
	        { name: "Mark Goldberg", age: 51, id: 2, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] },
	        { name: "Jen Statford", age: "25", id: 3, phone: ["954-600-1234", "954-355-5555"] }
        ];

What I’d like to do is to render the basic information like the name and age in one template and then render the phone numbers for each client in a different template.

Like I showed in my previous post, we first create a template for our layout:

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
	<p><a href="clients/${id}">${name} - Age: ${age}</a></p>
</script>

This will display the name and age as a hyperlink included within paragraph tags. Next, we create a new template that will be used to render the phone numbers for each client”

<script id="phoneTemplate" type="text/html">
	<ul>{{each phone}}<li>${$value}</li>{{/each}}</ul>
</script>

Lastly, we’re going to include the call to “phoneTemplate” in our main template using the “tmpl” tag. This tag is used by the plugin to identify templates and parse them accordingly. Here’s what the call would look like:

{{tmpl($data) "#phoneTemplate"}}

and we’re going to include it into the main template:

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
	<p><a href="clients/${id}">${name} - Age: ${age}</a></p>
	{{tmpl($data) "#phoneTemplate"}}
</script>

This will generate the following results:

There are a couple of key things to understand here. First, let’s look at the following:

{{tmpl($data) "#phoneTemplate"}}

The variable “$data” contains the data for the current record being parsed. We’re passing it to the nested template so that we can work with that record. Let’s move onto the nested template:

<script id="phoneTemplate" type="text/html">
	<ul>{{each phone}}<li>${$value}</li>{{/each}}</ul>
</script>

Now that the current record has been passed to it, we can access the attribute name, in this case “phone”, and loop through each phone record using the ‘{{each}}‘ plugin template tag. Think of it as similar to jQuery’s $.each() method or a JavaScript “for” loop. The code will loop through each phone record creating a new list item for each one and then return to the main template to get the next main record.

Here’s the whole code for you to work with:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head> 
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" /> 
  <meta name="robots" content="noindex" /> 
  <title>Template Test</title> 
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  <script src="jquery.tmpl.js" type="text/javascript"></script>  
  <script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {

        var clientData = [
	        { name: "Rey Bango", age: 42, id: 1, phone: [ "954-600-1234", "954-355-5555" ] },
	        { name: "Mark Goldberg", age: 51, id: 2, phone: ["617-777-1234", "617-222-3333"] },
	        { name: "Jen Statford", age: "25", id: 3, phone: ["608-555-5647", "608-645-8855"] }
        ];

        $("#clientTemplate").tmpl(clientData).appendTo("div");

});
  </script>

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
	<p><a href="clients/${id}">${name} - Age: ${age}</a></p>
	{{tmpl($data) "#phoneTemplate"}}
</script>

<script id="phoneTemplate" type="text/html">
	<ul>{{each phone}}<li>${$value}</li>{{/each}}</ul>
</script>
  
</head> 
 
<body> 

<div></div>

</body> 
</html> 

Not Using jQuery JavaScript Templates? You’re Really Missing Out.

In preparation for my upcoming talk on jQuery Templates, I’ve been been deep diving into the jQuery Template plugin created by Microsoft.. Many of you are probably familiar with server-side template engines like Smarty or Cheetah but only recently have client-side template engines taken off. Considering how complex our web apps are becoming, it makes total sense.

The cool thing about templates is that it lets you easily structure your content display without all the hassle of string concatenation. For example, say I had a data set containing an ID and a name and I wanted to display the name as a hyperlink.

I could do something like this:

var clRec = "";

for(var i=0; i<client.name.length; i++) {
    clRec += "<li><a href='clients/"+client.id[i]+"'>" + client.name[i] + "</a></li>";
}

but to me, this seems much more readable and maintainable:

<li><a href="clients/${id}">${name}</a></li>

The second code snippet is a template I’ve created to render a hyperlinked name in a list and it’s very easy to do. First, include both jQuery and the jQuery Template plugin into your page:

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="jquery.tmpl.js" type="text/javascript"></script>  

Next, define the data that you’d like to see rendered. This could be data derived from an XHR call or something you’ve predefined, like this:

	var clientData = [
		{ name: "Rey Bango", id: 1 },
		{ name: "Mark Goldberg", id: 2 },
		{ name: "Jen Statford", id: 3 }
	];

Now, define your template:

<script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
	<li><a href="clients/${id}">${name}</a></li>
</script>

Yep, the “script” tags are necessary and used because they allow your template to be embedded within the body of the page. Notice that we’ve defined the placeholders as ${id} & ${name}, the same names used in the identifiers in our data. The “${}” tells the template parser that the field needs to be replaced with the expected value.

Then call the jQuery Template plugin to render the data using your template:

$("#clientTemplate").tmpl(clientData).appendTo( "ul" );

The plugin’s .tmpl() method accepts the data we’ve defined and handles the parsing of the template we’ve selected. Then we use jQuery’s .appendTo() method to append the results to an unordered list tag. This gives me the following results:

That’s it! Told you it was simple. :)

I’ll go into more advanced details during my presentation but this should give you something to start with in the meantime. Here’s the full source for you to use:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head> 
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" /> 
  <meta name="robots" content="noindex" /> 
  <title>Template Test</title> 
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  <script src="jquery.tmpl.js" type="text/javascript"></script>  
  <script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {

	var clientData = [
		{ name: "Rey Bango", id: 1 },
		{ name: "Mark Goldberg", id: 2 },
		{ name: "Jen Statford", id: 3 }
	];


$("#clientTemplate").tmpl(clientData).appendTo( "ul" );


});
  </script>

 <script id="clientTemplate" type="text/html">
	<li><a href="clients/${id}">${name}</a></li>
</script>
  
</head> 
 
<body> 

<ul></ul>

</body> 
</html> 

I’m Presenting on jQuery Templates at ThinkVitamin’s jQuery Online Conference

This coming Monday (7/12/2010), I’ll be one of the speakers at Think Vitamin’s jQuery Online Conference. I’ll be speaking about using the Microsoft jQuery Template plugin to produce easily maintainable dynamic pages via pre-built JavaScript templates. This is a great topic and it looks like the event is generating a lot of registrations. Very cool.

I’ll be joined by three other awesome speakers including John Resig, Karl Swedberg and Ben Alman. Here’s the breakdown of the sessions:

Topics and schedule

  • Beyond String Concatenation. Using jQuery Templating to Cleanly Display Your Data
    Rey Bango

    In this presentation, Rey will show you a new way to produce easily maintainable dynamic pages via pre-built JavaScript templates and the Microsoft jQuery templating plugin.
  • Testing Your Mobile Web Apps
    John Resig

    This talk will be a comprehensive look at what you need to know to properly test your web applications on mobile devices, based upon the work that’s been done by the jQuery team. We’ll look at the different mobile phones that exist, what browsers they run, and what you can do to support them. Additionally we’ll examine some of the testing tools that can be used to make the whole process much easier.
  • Taking jQuery Effects to the Next Level
    Karl Swedberg

    One of the first things web developers learn to do with jQuery is to show and hide elements on a page and then add some flair by sliding those elements up and down or fading them in and out. Too often, though, we stop there, missing out on the incredible range and flexibility of jQuery’s core effects. In this talk, we’ll investigate both standard and custom animations and how they can be used to create useful and fun effects. We’ll also build a couple effects plugins, explore parts of the effects API that are often overlooked, and learn how to avoid common problems when attaching these effects to certain events.
  • jQuery Pluginization
    Ben Alman

    In this live-coding session, Ben explains how, with just a little thought and effort around generalization, parameterization and organization, you can convert your “just get the job done” jQuery code into a legitimate, reusable, modular jQuery plugin.

This really is a great lineup and I’m looking forward to being a part of this great event. It’s been a very long time since I’ve done a presentation so this will be a good warm up for some other conferences I plan on speaking at later this year.

Be sure to use the following discount code for a 15% discount on registration: jquery15

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